Available plugins and configuration

This page lists the available plugins. Note that to enable a plugin, your bot app should include an enabled = true entry in the pyproject.toml file under the section for the specific plugin.

CircleCI Artifacts

The CircleCI service provides the option of storing build artifacts. The baldrick plugin will automatically post the link to the artifacts as a status check in a GitHub pull request to avoid having to click through multiple pages to find the link to the artifacts. To enable this plugin, include the following in your pyproject.toml file:

[ tool.<your-bot-name>.circleci_artifacts ]
enabled = true

You can then include additional sub-sections in the configuration for each set of artifacts, for example:

[ tool.<your-bot-name>.circleci_artifacts.sphinx ]
url = "html/index.html"
message = "This is the documentation"

The url item should be set to the file path of the artifacts, and the message is what will be shown in the status check.

Push handlers

We provide a plugin that will perform custom actions whenever a push is made to a repository, whether to a branch or a tag.

To enable pull request handlers, include the following in your pyproject.toml file:

[ tool.<your-bot-name>.pushes ]
enabled = true

If you want to write your own custom handler, import push_handler from baldrick as follows:

from baldrick.plugins.github_pushes import push_handler

then use it to decorate a function of the form:

@push_handler
def do_something_on_push(repo_handler, git_ref):
    ...

This function will be called with repo_handler, an instance of RepoHandler (click on the class names to find out the available properties/methods), and git_ref which will be a string containing the ref for the push (e.g. refs/heads/master). If the git_ref is a branch, repo_handler.branch will be correctly set, but note that the git_ref could also point to a tag.

Pull request handlers

We provide a plugin that will perform checks on a pull request and report the results back to the pull request using status checks. Which checks are done are themselves plugins and will be described in subsequent sections.

To enable pull request handlers, include the following in your pyproject.toml file:

[ tool.<your-bot-name>.pull_requests ]
enabled = true

In addition, you can use the following configuration items if you wish to change the default behavior:

  • skip_labels = []: this can be set to a list of GitHub labels which, if present, will cause the checks to be skipped. Note that labels are case-sensitive. The default is an empty list.

  • skip_fails = false/true: if true, if the checks are skipped due to skip_labels, then a failed status check will be posted to the pull request. If false, the checks will be silently skipped. The default is true.

GitHub milestone checker

This pull request handler plugin checks whether the milestone has been set. To enable this plugin, include the following in your pyproject.toml file:

[ tool.<your-bot-name>.milestones ]
enabled = true

If you wish to customize the message shown in the results of the check, you can use the missing_message = "..." and present_message = "..." configuration items.

If you wish to set a longer message to be shown on the checks tab, you can set missing_message_long and present_message_long.

Towncrier changelog checker

Another built-in pull request handler plugin can be used to check that towncrier changelog changes in a pull request are consistent with other details about the pull request (e.g. the pull request number). To enable this plugin, include the following in your pyproject.toml file:

[ tool.<your-bot-name>.towncrier_changelog ]
enabled = true

This plugin has the following additional configuration items:

  • verify_pr_number = true: whether to check that the name of the towncrier file added is consistent with the pull request number.

  • changelog_skip_label = "...": the name of a GitHub label which, if present, causes the towncrier changelog checks to be skipped.

  • help_url = "...": this can be set to the URL to use for the status check ‘Details’ link - you can set this to a URL explaining how to use towncrier for example.

By default, the comment/statuses posted by the bot should be informative, but if you wish to change the wording of these messages, you can override them with the following parameters:

  • changelog_exists = "..." and changelog_missing = "...": the messages to use when a changelog entry exists or is missing.

  • number_correct = "..." and number_incorrect = "...": the messages to use when a changelog entry has the correct or incorrect pull request number.

  • type_correct = "..." and type_incorrect = "...": the messages to use when a changelog entry is not of the right type.

Each of these configuration options has a _long equivalent, i.e. changelog_missing_long, which will be displayed on the checks page to provide more details.

Custom plugin

If you want to write your own pull request checker, import pull_request_handler from baldrick as follows:

from baldrick.plugins.github_pull_requests import pull_request_handler

then use it to decorate a function of the form:

@pull_request_handler
def check_changelog_consistency(pr_handler, repo_handler):
    ...

This function will be called with pr_handler, an instance of PullRequestHandler, and repo_handler, an instance of RepoHandler (click on the class names to find out the available properties/methods).

Your function should then return either None (no check results), or a dictionary where each key is the code name for one of the checks (this will be used to match checks with previous checks, so make sure this is consistent across calls), and the value should be a dictionary with at least two entries: conclusion, which can be set to success, failure, neutral, cancelled, timed_out, or, action_required and title, which sets the description of the check on the status line. Other keys in this dictionary will be passed to the baldrick.github.PullRequestHandler.set_check method.